Public and general interest

Funding for drug and alcohol prevention, treatment and recovery services

How drug and alcohol prevention, treatment and recovery services are funded
Alcohol and drug misuse prevention and treatment for dependence are an important part of public health responsibilities and continue to be a key priority for the government.

Historically, 34% of national spend on public health has been on substance misuse, and this has been recognised in the target formula for the public health grants, which clearly illustrates the significance of the agenda.

The primary budget for these services is the ring-fenced public health grant but there may well be other local investment in services and local authorities will want to exploit opportunities to lever in investment from elsewhere.

Activity and performance on drug treatment has had an impact on how much money an area has received and how quickly they will be moving to target next year.

Local authorities will be required to report spending on an annual basis. There are categories for adult drugs, adult alcohol and YP drug and alcohol spending. 

More about the pooled treatment budget (PTB)

Prior to 2013/4 drug treatment was in part funded through  a central government contribution to local funding (known as the pooled treatment budget – PTB).

The pooled treatment budget allocations were made to local partnerships via primary care trusts based on a formula that recognised key deprivation factors, numbers in effective treatment* and latterly for  increasing successful completions from treatment - ensuring the money went to the areas most in need.  

  • A detailed breakdown of the allocations of the 2010/11 pooled treatment budget (PTB) can be found here.
  • A detailed breakdown of the allocations of the 2011/12 pooled treatment budget (PTB) can be found here.
  • A detailed breakdown of the allocations of the 2012/13 pooled treatment budget (PTB) can be found here.

 Funding for prison treatment was made available through Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs).

  • A detailed breakdown of 2011/12 adult prison substance misuse funding can be found here.
  • A detailed breakdown of 2011/12 children and young people's secure estate substance misuse funding can be found here.

* Effective treatment – adults who are discharged from treatment 12 weeks or more after triage, or who remain in treatment 12 weeks after triage, or who were discharged from treatment within 12 weeks in a planned way

 
 
 
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